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EBOOK LAJJA BY TASLIMA NASRIN

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Editorial Reviews. Language Notes. Text: English (translation) Original Language: Bengali Kindle Store · Kindle eBooks · Literature & Fiction. Look inside this book. Lajja (Tamil) by [தஸ்லிமா நஸ்ரின், Taslima Nasrin] by தஸ்லிமா நஸ்ரின் (Author), Taslima Nasrin (Author). This novel written by Taslima Nasreen, a citizen of Bangladesh reveals the staunch religion and the inhuman treatment by one man to another. Dutt Family is the.


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Free download or read online ✅Lajja bangla book from the category of Taslima Nasrin. Portable Document Format (PDF) file size of Lajja is MB. Read "Lajja" by Taslima Nasrin available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first purchase. A savage indictment of religious extremism and. Read "Lajja" by Taslima Nasrin available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get RS. off your first purchase. A savage indictment of religious extremism.

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Lajja: Shame by Taslima Nasrin

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Choose Store. Despite being members of a small, vulnerable Hindu community, they refuse to leave their country, unlike most of their friends and relatives. Sudhamoy believes with a naive mix of optimism and idealism that his motherland will not let him down.

And then, on 6 December , the Babri Masjid is demolished. The world condemns the incident, but its immediate fallout is felt most acutely in Bangladesh, where Muslim mobs begin to seek out and attack Hindus. Skip this list. Ratings and Book Reviews 0 1 star ratings 0 reviews. Overall rating 5. How to write a great review Do Say what you liked best and least Describe the author's style Explain the rating you gave Don't Use rude and profane language Include any personal information Mention spoilers or the book's price Recap the plot.

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No, cancel Yes, report it Thanks! More filters. Sort order. A devastating account of the demolition of Babri Masjid in India and its inhumane reverberations in the lives of millions of Hindus in Bangladesh. What begins as a slow paced story spirals into a heartbraking account once the violence hits the protagonist and his family.

View 1 comment. Nov 16, Sidharth Vardhan rated it really liked it Shelves: The book follows the story of one Sudhamay and his children Suranjan and Maya. The father and son have both been involved in nationalistic movements of Bangladesh and believe in their country.

All his life, he has compromised on his religious identity for sake of national identity. The novel follows the disillusionment of this father and son about their country. What was born as a secular state has a Department of Religion which has a heavy budget almost all of which goes to promotion of Islam. A very nominal sum is allotted for minority religions — in fact four times that sum goes only to rehabilitation of those who chose to converted to Islam.

The schools have special Islamic classes which makes minority kids feel alienated. There is discrimination in job allocation with almost no Hindus ever making to upper steps of hierarchical ladder. Hindus don't get licences to start business except when it is in a partnership with a Muslim.

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There are several other ways in which the Hindus are discriminated, and both were aware of them, but if you are emotionally invested in some belief you hold on to it against much contrary evidence.

To be fair, such discrimination is present in some degree in most of Indian subcontinent countries. The book is set in the back-drop of riots that followed demolition of Babri Masjid.

She often gives the death toll of riots in India. And that goes for Bangladeshi spades too - again questioning the communal party who was causing riots and secular ruling party which had maintained silence.

Obviously it was Hindus in India and not Bangladesh who were guilty of destroying mosque, but it has always been a tendency of weak minds to carry out their anger not on those who they are angry at, but on those on whom they can afford to be angry at.

There are countless examples - instead of questioning powerful business-people and politicians for not raising wages and jobs, people would rather blame minorities, immigrants and reservation quotas; instead of being angry at police for not providing protection, people will rather blame the women who got raped for being out in the middle of night etc.

And so, Bangladeshi Hindus had to suffer - destruction of temples, riots, murders, rapes, forced conversations, black-mail about leaving the country etc. Nasrin's characters realize that powerful will always oppress the weak — the men will oppress the women, the majority religion people will oppress the minorities, the rich will oppress the poor and so on. The book sometimes reads like fictionalized non-fiction with arguments and information being the key subject of book and story only getting the second seat.

Almost half the book goes to listing every incidence of riot that ever occurred in Bangladesh — naming city and number of people killed, women raped and temples destroyed there.

She also lists at least some incidences of India. These longs lists although effective initially in giving the sheer volume of violence, soon gets a bit boring and even skim-able. Another problem is that this incidences are being mentally listed by characters in their mind and orally recited to each-other, as if they have crammed all this information like news channels reporters do.

But that is the problem, the information is not even being broadcast-ed on television — they just seems to know about incidences occurring in distant cities by intuition. It is a minor thing but it keeps occurring again and again. Similarly Surnajan seems to remember sayings of Jinnah and Kalam okay as well as the constitution along with the many amendments that have gone in it not okay. It would have made more sense if the omniscient narrator herself had shared the information and arguments directly instead of giving her characters hard-disk memories.

Regarding disputed land, I've always believed like Suranjan that all religious places should be destroyed and houses for poor, orphanages, hospitals, schools etc- in short something actually useful should be built in their place, and if you have enough land for that already, sell the land and use the money for charitable purposes but am against destruction of worshipping place of one religion for building that of other.

Although I also had an Uncle who had another attractive, practical and secular idea as to what should be done to disputed land and if you were to extend the idea a little, it will solve all religious problems at once - his idea was to build a pub in that place, and both Hindus and Muslims would drink in the pub in complete communal harmony.

I would rather make Alcohalism the sole religion for the whole world We shall baptise at age of five - by feeding the kid half a glass of Jack Martin, it will still be better than all the funny things religious people keep doing to their children.

And if you consider it blasphemous, just look at evidence - Christ turned water into wine and gaveth it to people - I mean what does that tell you? Holy Grail wouldn't have been half as interesting if Jesus had drunk water from it - and what kind of rest you think God was having on seventh day? He obviously didnt go to church. Almost all Sufi poets talk about wine; and what do you think that 'somras' that Hindu dieties loved drinking so much was?

Why, friends, it was just your every day Blenders Pride brewed with a lot of sugar at initial stages to give it a sweet taste. And Greeks and Romans actually had Gods of wine - Dionysus and Bacchus; who can easily serve for those into idol worship.

Lajja: Shame

Admit it, it is that one God that every religion worship - and being a deeply pious soul myself, it kills me to see how so many people miss the obvious truth. There are other benifits too, including the fact that making confessions are so far easier if you are drunk - and chances are if you are frequently drunk, you will have something real to confess about; wine comes in many brands and chances are you will like one brand or other and so it is far more attractive religion and above all, all religions offer their Utopias otherwise called 'heavens' or 'paradise' only after death - I mean it's a life time of wait; and even that with a lot of stipulations as to what you can or can not do meanwhile; and they will give you a hell of time if you fail to fulfil them.

Alcoholism is only religion that provides services of instant Utopia for price of a few bucks and a bit of hangover. And so, if you are wise enough to adhere my summons, then it is high time we replace priests with bartenders. View all 6 comments. Feb 21, Aishu Rehman rated it it was ok. Apr 22, Jerry Jose rated it liked it.

Babri Masjid demolition, under whatever justifications, is undoubtedly the single greatest failure of our democracy and secularism. While it spiked communal unrest in India, immediate butterfly effect was visible somewhere else, someplace that shares the same secular values, at Bangladesh. Author claims to have written this novel over a week of religious unrest, which escalated into demolition of century old temples and violence against minority Hindus, in retaliation to what happenings in India.

Lajja tells the story of a Hindu family, torn between their love towards lush green motherland they and their ancestors fought Independence for, and the choice of escape to India for the safety of their lives. But secularism in the new found nation was a grey line, or it became one over time, with the declaration of Islam as state religion and rapid Islamisization of institutions.

Through the thoughts and words of the hero, she subtly addressees the politics of language, how the streets and institutions were renamed, and how the ones that retained their old Hindu names were reduced to acronyms. It is easy to understand this book getting banned, for her active criticisms against Awami League, BJP, RSS and other communal political coalitions on their vote mongering hate politics, is very visible.

And the scariest part is, the relevance this book still holds, even after a decade of the pogrom, in a world we proudly call modern. View all 8 comments. Jul 03, Vidhi Chheda rated it really liked it. Taslima Nasrin, narrates a agonizing description of a country immersed in religious and political conflict.

The pain suffered within your country but still loving it. When you read it, Sudhamoy's optimism about Bangladesh is infuriating. You want to shake him up and say look at the reality and stop being so ideal.

But at the same time you still understand his love for the country for which Hindus and Muslims together fought for independence. Even after what happened to him, he continues to love Taslima Nasrin, narrates a agonizing description of a country immersed in religious and political conflict. Even after what happened to him, he continues to love his country. What makes me extremely sad is that at the end of the book, they have to sneak out of their own houses like thieve, dejected and without any hope.

Mar 05, Deepa Ranganathan rated it it was ok. Highly exhaustive in terms of its analysis of factual inputs. Was hoping for more story-telling than facts thrown at my face however important they may be. A read for those who prefer non-fiction-alized read of historical narratives. Sadly, I'm not one of them. View all 3 comments. May 20, Aditya Kelekar rated it it was amazing. Thirsting for my motherland's love In the winter of , shortly after Lajja was released, I remember participating in a Quiz contest and being asked to name the author of Lajja.

I had answered correctly: Taslima Nasreen. It was two years then since the Babri Masjid had been demolished, but I hadn't known of any connection between the demolition and the book.

In fact, it is only now on reading Lajja, a good twenty years since the book was launched, that I found out how the demolition of Babri Ma Thirsting for my motherland's love In the winter of , shortly after Lajja was released, I remember participating in a Quiz contest and being asked to name the author of Lajja.

In fact, it is only now on reading Lajja, a good twenty years since the book was launched, that I found out how the demolition of Babri Masjid had wrecked the lives of thousands of residents of Bangladesh.

Lajja meaning 'shame' is a novel set in Bangladesh and revolves around the life of a Hindu family, the Duttas. Sudhamoy and his wife, Kiranmoyee, have raised their children, Suranjan and Maya, to think of all religions as equal. But it's an unequal country. Once firmly swearing to the tenets of secularism, policy makers in Bangladesh have over the course of years become increasingly supportive of Muslim fundamentalists. State money has been channeled to build mosques and madrasas preaching Islam have mushroomed.

At every bend, Sudhamoy and his family suffer humiliation as a result of anti-minority policies crafted by the lawmakers, but Sudhamoy never once thinks about leaving his land. He loves his country and his countrymen too much for that. Droves of Sudhamoy's relatives leave for India for good to escape persecution by Muslim thugs, but Sudhamoy, who is trained in medicine, is content to earn a modest sum working as a doctor in his own country.

Indeed, the wellspring of love for one's motherland is deep and unremitting. When the story starts, it is the winter of and the Babri Masjid at Ayodhya, a place in Northern India, has been demolished in India by fanatic Hindus, with no connection to the Hindus of Bangladesh. Yet, the fact that Hindus destroyed the Masjid is reason enough for Muslim fundamentalists in Bangaldesh to inflict a spate of atrocities against the minority Hindu population.

Even as homes of Hindu families go up in flames, temples are demolished and hundreds of Hindus are murdered, Sudhamoy holds steadfast to the hope that normalcy will return and sense will prevail.

The story is told as events unfold the way they are seen through the eyes of Suranjan, Sudhamoy's son. Father and son share the same nationalistic spirit, but Suranjan, who lacks discipline and focus, has turned into a loafer.

When news of the atrocities committed on Hindus flood in and Suranjan has a first-hand experience of how Hindus are regarded as second-class citizens, his faith in his fellow men is swept away. But Suranjan doesn't have our sympathies yet.

When his father suffers a serious stroke, he does little to provide relief by way of words or constructive action. On the contrary, his sister Maya is engrossed in nursing their father back to health.

As a reader you resign yourself to the thought that Suranjan is cut out to be a lame actor on this stage while Sudhamoy and his wife play their part of caring parents accepting their son's shortcomings. And then the real trouble comes home, thrash everything around with brute force.

Dutta's daughter, Maya, is abducted by rioters when they barge in to demolish their house. It is heart-breaking. All through the first part of the story, you have seen Suranjan visiting friends, squandering his time. It's only now that you see him rise up to the occasion, and do what his role in the family demands. Hysteric, he spends days and nights combing through the town hoping to find his sister. Your heart goes out to him.

Suranjan can no longer look at any Muslim without suspicion. The violence around continues unabated You want to cling to that hope that, no matter what the family has gone through, Maya will return and "everything will be all right.

The expression is of dread, and one dare say, of hope. She is with other ladies and all of them appear to face a similar fate. I thought maybe the lady is Maya, held captive at some place, and thinking of a possible escape route.

Maya was in my subconscious throughout while reading the book and she continues to be in my mind. Lajja is a honest book and tells a heart-wrenching story of a family beaten up, but unwilling to give up. It's also a story of a nation that has betrayed its people. And of religions whose only purpose seems to be to divide people.

That the book was banned in large parts of our subcontinent goes to prove that we have thrown introspection out of the window. That we have no lajja. The factual data presented throughout the book may dwindle the reader's interest, however, this is justified by the motif to bring into light the intensity of the massacre which was condoned so says the book by the bangladesh A devastating account of the demolition of Babri Masjid in India and its inhumane reverberations in the lives of millions of Hindus in Bangladesh.

The factual data presented throughout the book may dwindle the reader's interest, however, this is justified by the motif to bring into light the intensity of the massacre which was condoned so says the book by the bangladesh government despite it claiming to have a secular constitution.

The spread of this fundamentalist-driven mayhem across international boundaries proves that religious fanaticism presides nationalism. Otherwise, why would the Bangla Islamic extremists decide to kill their own hindu brethren for demolition of Babri Masjid in India by Indian Hindus?

Of course, not all are extremists, but one is enough to wreak havoc. Let the edifices of religions crumble, let a blind fire consume all the bricks in temples, mosques gurdwaras and churches, and on those ruins let us grow enchanting Gardens of sweet-smelling flowers and build schools and libraries.

Let places of worship be used for the good of people and be turned into hospitals, orphanages, schools and universities. Our new places of worship should be academies of art and culture, centers of creativity and Institutes of scientific research. Let the rice fields with golden grain bathed by the early rays of sun, the open field and rivers and the deep sea be our new places of prayer.

Let humanity be the other name for religion. The book is a laudable work of courage, and it lifts the smoke screen from the pretentious secularism to reveal inequality and fascist fundamentalism. It exposes the shame of a country. Mar 30, Amit Srivastava rated it it was amazing.

I read this book in my late teenage. That time it was sounding like a total fiction to me. But by knowing the realities of the Muslim fanatics of Pakistan and Bangladesh later, I guess it was much lesser than reality. This novel tells about the miserable lives of Hindus in Bangladesh. The way ISIS has been treating non-muslim women, the Lajja can be story of non-Muslim women in almost every muslim country.

The mindset of Muslim predators is explained in the story line. The helplessness of Hindu I read this book in my late teenage. The helplessness of Hindu women Kafir in Muslim land is narrated. One must read it to understand the present and past of Indian subcontinent. Our official history removes such gruesome details for suit their political agenda. But truth must be told. I salute the courage of Taslima for telling the truth in best way. Sebelum membaca buku ini aku sudah baca beberapa reviewnya, jadi sudah dapat memperkirakan isinya, tapi tetap masih penasaran untuk membacanya.

Beruntung dapat pinjaman dari Nurul. Lajja dalam bahasa Bangladesh berarti malu ,novel fiksi yang bersumber dari fakta yang nyata tentang 13 hari kehidupan keluarga Sudhamoy di Bangladesh yang penuh teror dan ketakutan.

Bangladesh adalah Negara pecahan dari Pakistan, tepatnya di Pakistan sebelah timur. Bangladesh berdiri pada th. Pada awalnya perbedaan ini tidak menjadi masalah karena mereka sama-sama berjuang untuk kemerdekaan. Tapi ketika thn UUD Bangladesh diubah dengan mencantumkan Islam sebagai agama resmi, maka keadaan berubah, kedamaian tidak dirasakan lagi.

Adalah mesjid Babri di Ayodya India yang menjadi pangkal mulanya. Mesjid ini didirikan pada abad 16 oleh Mughal I Babur dengan menghancurkan bentuk asalnya yaitu sebuah kuil. Pada tanggal 6 Desember terjadi pembakaran mesjid Babri ini oleh umat Hindu. Umat Islam di Bangladesh melakukan pembalasan kepada umat Hindu yang ada di Bangladesh. Harta benda mereka dirampas, rumah ibadah Hindu dihancurkan dan perempuan-perempuannya diperkosa. Terjadi kekacauan dan teror yang mengerikan sehingga umat Hindu banyak yang berimigrasi ke India dan Srilangka karena sudah merasa tidak aman di negaranya sendiri Taslima Nasrin bercerita dengan data yang detail sehingga seperti membaca sebuah berita dari koran dan agak mengerikan membaca kejadian-kejadiannya, sehingga mungkin inilah yang membuat beberapa pembaca muslim tersinggung.

Tapi bila dicermati hal ini sebenarnya ditujukan buat pemeluk agama apapun yang fanatik berlebihan sehingga menghalalkan segala cara bahkan melanggar ajaran agamanya sendiri.

Membaca buku ini bagiku memberikan pembelajaran bagaimana agar kita sebagai manusia beragama dapat berempati kepada kaum minoritas. Hal-hal yang dianggap biasa selama ini,- contoh kecil adalah pelajaran agama di sekolah 'negri' cerita di sini hampir sama dengan pengalamanku duluu dimana anak yang beragama 'lain' boleh memilih diam di kelas atau ke luar tapi u mendapat ranking di kelas nilai ini ikut dihitung jadi merugikan anak tsb.

Kejadian-kejadian seperti yang ditulis Taslima Nasrin dapat terjadi dimanapun dengan agama apapun apabila pemeluknya bersikap fanatik berlebihan sehingga dapat menimbulkan pertumpahan darah dan mengorbankan rasa kemanusiaan Tak ada salahnya jika aku mengutip kata-kata K.

Mustafa Bisri: View 2 comments. Sep 20, Kristi rated it did not like it. The true shame is found in the fact that this vitally important topic is lost in the pedantic, repetitive recitation of the horrors inflicted upon the Hindu Bangladeshi by Muslims — pages and pages and pages of the stuff. After a while, the brain glazes over and refuses to absorb any more.

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