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This Pin was discovered by Lisa Sorgini. Discover (and save!) your own Pins on Pinterest. June / July Cover photo: Hiroshi Watanabe PDF size: MB Pages: Featured artists: Hiroshi Watanabe, Japan/ United States Eiji Ohashi, Japan. The first one is when BLUR will be published in print version? most frequent question was connected to transformation of old Bulb issues into PDF format.


Blur Magazine Pdf

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Feb/Mar | File size: MB (PDF) | Pages: | CLOSE-UP Dasha & Mari, The organizer of the Equinox contest is BLUR magazine, as published by the. Photography #magazine devoted to creative #photography, published as a PDF e-zine and read worldwide. blur magazine‏ @blur_magazine 10 Jun Let's see that cover by @HiroshiWatanabe on Issue 61 of @blurmagazine one more time!. The "Instantion" section of "BLUR Magazine" is curated by Michael Kirchoff and You can preview and download the digital PDF file here.

March Equinox in Zagreb, Croatia is on Thursday, September Apart from my personal interest in Wet Plate, there is another particular reason for this decision. I have been following the wet plate scene for a few years now, and I have done about 20 interviews so far with the wet plate photographers thanks to Denis and Goga for their help , some of the most famous and most interesting in the world. The contest will begin on the first day of spring and will last until the first day of autumn, a period in which the wet plate scene will be the focus of our interest. On the cover of our first issue in is the work of a very interesting, creative, and honored artist, Mark Osterman, who is probably a household name for the majority of wetplaters.

On the cover of our first issue in is the work of a very interesting, creative, and honored artist, Mark Osterman, who is probably a household name for the majority of wetplaters. The reasons for this, and the reason I chose Mark to be a juror in our wet plate contest, will be clear in the series of very interesting interviews to be presented in the Wet Plate section of BLUR this year.

Submit up to two of your best photos through our form below to enter our editorial review process that selects a total of 24 photos for publication in the upcoming issue of BLUR.

Strona Tomasz Mosionek Fotografia w przebudowie!

Close-up brings readers closer to a photographer by providing extensive insight into his work. The photographer is presented through a wide selection of photographs, a detailed interview, and by highlighting important biographical information.

Imagine talking with a photographer whom you admire over a cup of coffee. Delicate chiffon A palette of sensations. Successful cooperation between two sisters in the world of photography is rare. But certainly there are lots of advantages. To start, tell us something about yourself. Since our childhood, we have been attracted by beauty Our room always reminded of an art space where we used to create.

Watercolors and wet glass to receive an abstract pattern and then transform them into various visual scenes, artworks. We put black ink on paper with tiny lines revealing graceful silhouettes of women. Sometimes we were working together on one drawing using a single piece of paper to let one of us start it and the other one to continue and complete.

Project is a section that presents a photographer through a series of photos united by a particular theme that works as a cohesive whole and is elaborated on by an artist statement.

WET PLATE is a section dedicated to an antique photographic process discovered in the mid 19th century, which was also a primary photographic method used until the s. The images resulting from this process can be ambrotypes, glass negatives or tintypes. Although quite a demanding, expensive and lengthy process, wet plate collodion technique is gaining back its popularity among many contemporary photographers. For many of my Confidence series images I also made back up collodion negatives to be used for salted paper prints.

I also did a series called Amnesia Curiosa, a collaborative with some other performers, that features salt prints. And precisely to that point, where the average photography knowledge ends, your passion begins. Is this an adequate term, or is there, perhaps, a better term? Thank you. Yes, in some circles, particularly in the context of the collodion variants we have gained a reputation as the Adam and Eve of that revival. In your job, you researched and then recreated the evolution of photographic processes based on original writings and examples from the museum, and later taught these processes to the general public.

How were you introduced to photography, and how did you finally end up at the museum? Actually, my job at the museum was initially to teach photograph conservators how to identify early photographic processes. This also included how to determine the difference between a wellmade photographic image in poor condition compared to a poorly made image in good condition. My father originally introduced me to conventional silver based photography when I was a boy. He helped me put together a little darkroom in the dirt floor basement of our eighteenth century farm house in Pennsylvania.

By the time I was in high school, I already owned several antique ambrotypes, but had no idea how they were made until I started my own research in the mids while I was teaching photography in a private high school.

By the time I met France in , I was making collodion plates, mainly positives.

I was also teaching my high school students wet collodion and several other processes at this time. Shortly thereafter we were asked to come to the museum to teach what turned out to be the first public workshop of the current collodion revival. We also wrote a complete basic manual for workshop participants, which is still a popular resource for people learning the process.

The name of this section combines the words instant and station, or as we call it, a place for instant photography. Instant photography refers to any photographic process that allows photo development without the darkroom. Instant photography was developed in the s by Edwin Land, founder of the Polaroid Corporation. Because of its popularity, most of the photographers in this section use Polaroid film, but artists using Impossible or Fuji instant film are certainly welcome.

BLUR 35 by Photography Association CREATUS - Issuu

The name Playstick comes from a well known simplified male figure illustration called Play Stick. One minute we may be interpreting a rather Grimm story, while the next we are trying to see the inner eye of a passing white rabbit.

Wedding, portrait, and fine art photographer Laura Burlton mines her immediate family for many of her photographic musings; in fact, her daughters are the subjects of most of her personal work. A native Texan, her life-long love of photography is evident in the enthusiasm and commitment she brings to her craft. For much of her fine art work, Laura uses toy cameras to bring her ethereal and otherworldly images to life, though she still uses the occasional large format camera for some of her work.

Our room always reminded of an art space where we used to create. Watercolors and wet glass to receive an abstract pattern and then transform them into various visual scenes, artworks.

We put black ink on paper with tiny lines revealing graceful silhouettes of women. Sometimes we were working together on one drawing using a single piece of paper to let one of us start it and the other one to continue and complete.

Project is a section that presents a photographer through a series of photos united by a particular theme that works as a cohesive whole and is elaborated on by an artist statement. WET PLATE is a section dedicated to an antique photographic process discovered in the mid 19th century, which was also a primary photographic method used until the s. The images resulting from this process can be ambrotypes, glass negatives or tintypes.

Although quite a demanding, expensive and lengthy process, wet plate collodion technique is gaining back its popularity among many contemporary photographers. For many of my Confidence series images I also made back up collodion negatives to be used for salted paper prints. I also did a series called Amnesia Curiosa, a collaborative with some other performers, that features salt prints. And precisely to that point, where the average photography knowledge ends, your passion begins. Is this an adequate term, or is there, perhaps, a better term?

Thank you. Yes, in some circles, particularly in the context of the collodion variants we have gained a reputation as the Adam and Eve of that revival.

In your job, you researched and then recreated the evolution of photographic processes based on original writings and examples from the museum, and later taught these processes to the general public.

How were you introduced to photography, and how did you finally end up at the museum? Actually, my job at the museum was initially to teach photograph conservators how to identify early photographic processes. This also included how to determine the difference between a wellmade photographic image in poor condition compared to a poorly made image in good condition.

My father originally introduced me to conventional silver based photography when I was a boy. He helped me put together a little darkroom in the dirt floor basement of our eighteenth century farm house in Pennsylvania.

By the time I was in high school, I already owned several antique ambrotypes, but had no idea how they were made until I started my own research in the mids while I was teaching photography in a private high school. By the time I met France in , I was making collodion plates, mainly positives.

I was also teaching my high school students wet collodion and several other processes at this time. Shortly thereafter we were asked to come to the museum to teach what turned out to be the first public workshop of the current collodion revival.

We also wrote a complete basic manual for workshop participants, which is still a popular resource for people learning the process. The name of this section combines the words instant and station, or as we call it, a place for instant photography. Instant photography refers to any photographic process that allows photo development without the darkroom. Instant photography was developed in the s by Edwin Land, founder of the Polaroid Corporation.

Because of its popularity, most of the photographers in this section use Polaroid film, but artists using Impossible or Fuji instant film are certainly welcome. The name Playstick comes from a well known simplified male figure illustration called Play Stick. One minute we may be interpreting a rather Grimm story, while the next we are trying to see the inner eye of a passing white rabbit.

Wedding, portrait, and fine art photographer Laura Burlton mines her immediate family for many of her photographic musings; in fact, her daughters are the subjects of most of her personal work. A native Texan, her life-long love of photography is evident in the enthusiasm and commitment she brings to her craft.

For much of her fine art work, Laura uses toy cameras to bring her ethereal and otherworldly images to life, though she still uses the occasional large format camera for some of her work. Her photography has been showcased in galleries and museums as close as Houston and as far away as Canada, Austria, and Spain. Her work is also part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston and many private collections worldwide.

This type of photography is created with a pinhole camera, a camera that uses a small aperture, usually the size of a pinhole, instead of a lens. Basically, the smaller the hole, the sharper the resulting image.

Because of their simplicity, pinhole cameras are often handmade. It was even mentioned by great thinkers like Aristotle, Euclid, and Mo Jing. However, the first photograph created with a pinhole camera was by a Scottish scientist, Sir David Brewster in the s.

So why do I still take them? I think it was because I could, consistently, produce incredibly sharp and precise images that perhaps thrust me back in the opposite direction. How does one go about trying to explain the appeal of pinhole photography? One of the unique features is the incredible depth of field— everything in front of the camera is equally in focus.

They all have one thing in common though, a beautifully soft ethereal look and, at the same time, can be dark and foreboding.

CHERYL from California
I fancy reading books wildly. Look over my other articles. I am highly influenced by underwater target shooting.