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BIRTH ORDER BOOK

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The Birth Order Book book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. With insight and wit, Dr. Leman offers readers a fascinating. Dr. Leman's ever popular book on birth order is ready for a new generation of salelive.info insight and wit, Dr. Leman offers readers a. Dr. Kevin Leman's ever-popular book on birth order is getting a new look and updated writing. With insight and wit, Dr. Leman offers readers a fascinating and .


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The Birth Order Book: Why You Are the Way You Are [Dr. Kevin Leman] on salelive.info *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This updated edition of Dr. Editorial Reviews. Review. " sheds light on how our place in the family pecking order endows us with traits that shape us for life." -- Dallas Child, April The Birth Order Book: Why You Are the Way You Are is a non-fiction book by Dr. Kevin Leman on birth order and its potential influence on personality and.

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The Birth Order Book : Why You Are the Way You Are

Bestselling Series. Harry Potter. Popular Features. New Releases. The Birth Order Book: Kevin Leman. Description The order in which we are born has a powerful, far-reaching influence on the way we interact with others--at home, at work, with friends, and in the public square.

Kevin Leman's classic book on birth order is getting a new look, bringing his engaging, fascinating, and often funny observations to a new audience. With insight and wit, Dr. Leman shows readers how birth order affects personality, marriage and relationships, parenting style, career, and children. Anyone who wants to gain understanding about the ways they interact with others--and even overcome ingrained tendencies they never thought they'd be rid of--will love Dr.

Leman's insightful book.

Product details Format Paperback pages Dimensions x x Back cover copy Ever wonder why you just can't get along with certain people? Why you pick the friends you do? Why you chose the career path you're on? It's all about birth order. Birth order powerfully influences who you are, whom you marry, the job you choose, and the kind of parent you are. The Birth Order Book will help you understand yourself, get along better with others, overcome ingrained tendencies you never thought you could get rid of, be more successful in the workplace, and be a more effective parent.

And if you don't fit the typical mold for your birth order, you'll find out why. Thousands of people have unlocked the secrets of birth order already.

Shouldn't you be one of them?

The Birth Order Book: Why You Are the Way You Are

And no matter how you twist it, there is no way you can make a first born out of this last born, no matter how you twist my family structure. I discarded this book after Part 3. Apr 17, J.

As I started reading this book, I thought the concept was so interesting! That is, your personality is somewhat predetermined by whether you are an only child, first-born, middle-born, or the baby.

Some of it makes sense, but then he starts explaining all these "exceptions" and you start to realize he's just fooling himself to think that all first-borns are perfectionists and babies are just social butterflies.

There are just too many exceptions to really believe in any of this. View 1 comment. Feb 12, Stacy Beck rated it liked it. I liked it and learned some things along the way. Here are somethings I liked: The tendency is to let the lastborn sort of shift for himself.

Dec 17, Robin rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Leman does a terrific job of writing so that the concepts he presents are comprehensive, yet intellegent; without the pretention that so irritates me about many psychologists. I was amazed at how much I could fit myself, my siblings, my parents, my husband and his family and my kids into his explainations of how birth order effect our personalities.

And I love that he is not so absolute about his definitions either. They remain very flexible, as they should, because no one person exactly fits any precise mold. I was even able to see some changes I should make in my marriage although I have a fabulous relationship with my husband because my behavior could cause problems down the line.

I don't fool myself that understanding birth order will solve all my problems, but I think it could be a big help. Mar 11, Margaret McCamant rated it liked it. I picked this up on a remainder table a long time ago, just started reading it. Although it may be too much book for the material, the many funny stories about families and their quirks makes the reading go fast as we recognize ourselves and others all too easily.

We all seem to fit our birth order profiles quite well: I'm a pretty classic firstborn, with that overdeveloped sense of responsibility. I'm probably more the compliant than the aggressive firstborn, with plenty of perfectionism and no I picked this up on a remainder table a long time ago, just started reading it. I'm probably more the compliant than the aggressive firstborn, with plenty of perfectionism and no small tendency to be judgemental in the mix.

Leman's implications for hiring decisions, blended families, and general child-rearing are pretty interesting. Sep 06, Grace Snow rated it did not like it. My mother-in-law forced me to read this because she claimed that it would answer all my questions about my second-born.

She herself is a second-born. Instead, it was basically stupid and confusing.

There were more exceptions than rules to his theory. Basically, almost anyone can be considered a firstborn. You just have to have more than 2 or 3 years between you and your next older sibling. Or be a different gender than your older siblings. It was extremely unhelpful, and apparently in My mother-in-law forced me to read this because she claimed that it would answer all my questions about my second-born. It was extremely unhelpful, and apparently intentionally vague.

There are lots of theories about birth order. These don't seem to be very good ones. I read this book years ago and really enjoyed it. I came back to it because I was hoping to gain greater insight into my children and how to parent them within their birth order but the book was not that helpful.

Really nothing on middle born children. Most of the last born child info was all about the author's experience. In fact, a good portion of the book was just about the author's personal experience of birth order. I guess I was hoping for something less anecdotal and more philosophical. I I read this book years ago and really enjoyed it. I will have to see what else is out there. Maybe a return to The Child Whisperer? Very interesting. This book surprised me.

Lots of good information and I was not expecting to much. I would rate this closer to a 3. He also delves into marital relationships and birth order, as well as professional relationships. Sheds a lot of light on why people are the way they are and makes me more conscious of how to better parent my own small children. Leman has 5 kids o I would rate this closer to a 3.

The Birth Order Book - Wikipedia

All in all, and as most parents I expect would feel, he doesn't regret the expansion to his family in his later years and gave him some in home subjects to study as part of his Birth Order theories. Non-fiction is usually a slow reading exercise for me, and while the content is easy to understand - I found myself reading this one in small chunks.

I definitely believe I could read this several times and pull out new information each time. Feb 14, Josh Broccolo rated it really liked it. Interesting observations on how birth order affects people throughout their lives from the lens of a clinical psychologist. While I think the conclusions are a bit too broad to make assumptions about particular people although I suppose I would have the opposite critique were Leman to assert hard and fast rules , it's always interesting to learn about how others think.

What stuck out to me most about the book is the effect of parenting and "nurture" on a young child. In essence, all of Leman's f Interesting observations on how birth order affects people throughout their lives from the lens of a clinical psychologist.

Great info for my current stage of life. A solid read; we'll just have to see how it plays out in my own personal family circus. Lehman isn't as funny as he thinks he is or perhaps I don't share his brand of humor , but his assessment of birth order was fascinating and easy to see in my own family and friends.

Many reviews criticize this book for keeping birth order generalized, but he does it well and intentionally. Birth order is not a firm mold; it is merely a general pattern that can be worked out differently in each family. I listened to this book on audiobook, but I would like to get my hands on a paper copy.

Th Dr. There were many quizzes and lists spread throughout the book that I really couldn't take advantage as I mostly listened while driving. May 25, Mandy rated it really liked it. The author was completely accurate when explaining the firstborn child myself and my son , the middle child my daughter and husband , and the marriage dynamic of a middle child and firstborn my marriage. My youngest did not fit the mold of the last born child, but I believe that has a lot to do with her being parented by an oldest and having two oldest siblings.

The theory behind the birthing order is fascinating and clears up so many questions regarding family dynamics. The last few chapter The author was completely accurate when explaining the firstborn child myself and my son , the middle child my daughter and husband , and the marriage dynamic of a middle child and firstborn my marriage.

The last few chapters were a little redundant but really an overall interesting read. Loved it! What neat psychology. I learned a great deal about myself and how I see the world and why I'm different from my younger sisters in how I approach life.

There are chapters that didn't apply to me right now about raising a family, but I listened to them anyway and found them fascinating all the same. Also appreciated the information on birth order and marriage compatibility. Easy and fun to listen to. Feb 12, Varina Denman rated it really liked it. This book was so interesting, not only in regard to myself but also my children and siblings.

I actually read it as research for a novel I'm writing about sisters , but I enjoyed it a lot. Nice surprise. Apr 21, Candice rated it it was amazing.

A great book full of truth and humor. Very enlightening. I wish I would've read this years ago. I recommend this book to anyone with children! Oct 05, Tiana marked it as unfinished.

If you like biased stereotypes coming from a very self-congratulatory narrator, then this book is for you. View 2 comments. Interesting read Walked away with some good guidelines as to why I function the way I do. A little long, but Worth the read. May 20, Dorothy Alva rated it really liked it. A great book should have read it 30 years ago but very insightful.

Gave me a lot to think about myself, my kids and my spouse. Would like to read some of his other books.

What a great book, you will definitely will start understanding people and their peculiar behaviors!! Apr 06, Maureen Russell rated it it was amazing. Fascinating look at families and birth order and how one influences the other.

Really helped me see my twins in a different, more realistic light even though the time spent on multiple births was about a paragraph. Also helped me figure out some things about myself!

Definitely had some ah-ha moments! Would recommend it to anyone. There was a lot I liked about this book. I would actually recommend it to parents because I think it's really important for us to be aware of the patterns that our kids fall into because of their birth order, and how we can help them avoid developing many major weaknesses of their birth order.

That said, I think the author gives a little too much weight to birth order. He does admit that birth order is only one aspect of personality, but he also acts as though knowing someone's birth order tells There was a lot I liked about this book. He does admit that birth order is only one aspect of personality, but he also acts as though knowing someone's birth order tells us everything we need to know about them. For instance, he almost got off a plane after learning that the pilot was a last born child--as though no last born could ever be a good pilot!

He was comforted only upon learning that the last born pilot was actually a functional first born.

It can be done, and frankly I think it probably is done more than Leman realizes. As a therapist, he probably sees more people who have succumbed to extremes of their birth order than people who have overcome weaknesses and become well adjusted.

I think nature and nurture are both important, and this book is great because it explores the nurture side more than most personality typing systems. But nature is just as important as nurture, if not more so. Birth order certainly has an effect on our personalities, but I don't believe that it dictates them entirely.

I think it can be dangerous to put too much weight on birth order, because you may end up putting people in boxes unfairly. Another complaint I had was Leman's approach to last borns.

I'm a last born myself, and I felt disrespected a lot throughout the book. Leman spends almost the entire chapter about last borns talking about what a terror he was as a child and young adult, and what a "miracle" it was that he ever amounted to anything.

I think his story had a place in the book, but it went on for many pages and cast an extremely negative light on last borns. Also, throughout the book Leman called last borns "babies," even when describing adults. As a last born himself, he should have realized that we "babies" have a need to be respected and treated like adults he did talk about it, but he didn't actually do it. It really rubbed me the wrong way. I guess it's kind of a minor issue, but I would have liked to see the author treat last borns more objectively, since he's the expert.

Despite these complaints, I do think the ideas in this book are really important, particularly for parents. I think the information here just needs to be combined with other ways of assessing and understanding personality.

Jul 19, Shannon rated it really liked it Recommended to Shannon by: Melissa Culbreth Benson. I started to give this book three stars and then thought, "Well, it's a non-fiction book that I actually read. That probably merits four stars in and of itself. If a book isn't going to transport me somewhere else, I'm generally not excited about reading it. Life is real enough for me without reading about it, too.

What I enjoyed about this book was that it helped me understand myself better, which I hope will ultimately make me a better person I started to give this book three stars and then thought, "Well, it's a non-fiction book that I actually read. What I enjoyed about this book was that it helped me understand myself better, which I hope will ultimately make me a better person and a better mom.

A friend who is a middle child gave me the book to help me understand my middle daughter better, so when I picked the book up, it was with the intention of learning more about Bekah. Instead, I flipped it open to a chapter on perfectionism, which is decidedly more a Shannon issue than a Bekah issue. I gained great insight in myself through reading that chapter and went back to the front and pretty much skimmed or read the entire book.

I don't read a lot of parenting books. I'm not sure why. Perhaps it's my general dislike for non-fiction, but I also think I mostly know what to do as a parent, it's execution where I fail. When I stop to think about what I think my daughters need, I am generally able to figure it out. So I don't need to read a book to tell me what to do.

I just need to do what I know I should. But I did like reading a book that helped me understand who they are better. I liked the tips for parenting first born, middle child and last born children, but I think I'll ultimately gain more from just understanding my daughters better. I think this book can help you understand yourself, your husband and your children better. And it's a pretty easy read.

So when you're in the mood for non-fiction, give this one a try. View all 3 comments. Aug 21, Leslie rated it really liked it. A hilarious and insightful read! I learned a lot about myself, my husband, parents, and siblings while reading this book. Though my family is a weird make up his chapters on each birth order described each of my siblings to a T Clark and I are first born personalities, Becca is and only child, and Thayne is a Middle.

Also his chapters on perfectionism were incredible!

I learned a lot about myself, having never thought of myself as a perfectionist I realized that according to his definition I a A hilarious and insightful read!

SHARON from Mississippi
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